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Burning Man

A layer of white playa dust coats the cars, clothes, and smiles of “burners” re- turning back to civilization as Burning Man comes to an end.

Rachel Lightner, Opinion Editor

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A layer of white playa dust coats the cars, clothes, and smiles of “burners” returning back to civilization as Burning Man comes to an end.

Black Rock City is a place that seems to be created from magic. Nevada’s temporary, third largest city, rises from dust overnight, and lures in over 70,000 people for a celebration of life, love, and gratitude.

It is a place where judgment and identity is eliminated, and replaced with inclusion to all.

What started as a small gathering of like-minded individuals on Baker Beach in San Francisco in 1986, has evolved into one of the world’s largest festivals known as Burning Man.

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‘Burners’ enjoy the dust and the Playa at Black Rock City, Nevada. Photo: Rachel Lightner

 Burning Man is an environment of expression, and the artwork displayed there is a representation of the endless possibilities of creativity. From a 747 jet plane turned music stage, to a 50-foot tall humpback whale made out of steel and stained glass, Burning Man allows the human mind to express their artistic values beyond normal limits.

“Burning Man opens your eyes to the true potential of what an artist can create and how they express themselves,” said Junior Cole Davidson. “I look at it as the modern day renaissance, it is evolutionary to our society and our social convention.”

From young children to doctors, Burning Man welcomes patrons of all forms– no judgment or discrimination.

There are ten principles of the festival, the first being Radical Inclusion. Anyone may be a part of Burning Man; strangers are welcomed and included. No prerequisites exist for participation in the community.

“I love the fact that there is no social barrier at Burning Man,” said Rosie Hackett, director of Outdoor Adventure Leadership. “It’s not the typical festival. It’s for everybody.”

The impact Burning Man has on its attendants is apparent through its continuous support within the community and by residents of the surrounding community.

“It’s a loving atmosphere,” said Davidson. “It will change your perspective on how you perceive your everyday life.”

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Photo: Rachel Lightner

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Photo: Rachel Lightner

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Burning Man